THEME BY SARAHCATHS+
Work hard, dream harder.
Greetings!
In this blog you'll find my adventures in writing.
For now, fanfiction is my drug of choice, to keep me on my toes.
It makes me write regularly since I know there are people expecting more.
Expect fanfics from Sherlock and Harry Potter for now. Also, fic recs!
Who knows what might be next.

bootsnblossoms:

sweetieyouwatchusrun:

cunt-convention:

odysseydawn:

Moon flowers, yes? My grandmother loved these, we have them planted in our garden :)

looks like something out of Coraline :o

I have a story. We used to have a bunch of these outside our house. They really do open up like this as soon as it gets dark and they release this wonderful smell. My family used to go outside every day and watch them open. But what they don’t tell you is that bugs love them. When it gets hot out they’ll crawl inside them to keep cool. So one day little me, I was probably like 13, put my nose right down by it so I could smell it as it was opening… and a huge ass jumping spider launched itself at my face. Don’t trust the moon flowers. They’re full of horror.

That’s true in more ways than one. Moonflowers are actually datura - angel’s trumpets. They’re very toxic, and have been use for hundreds of years as a poison and hallucinogen. 

posted 2 weeks ago with 358,845 notes

TID Appreciation Week - day two
Favorite Book Out of the Series - All Of Them (Clockwork Angel, Clockwork Prince & Clockwork Princess)

posted 2 weeks ago with 1,919 notes
imsuggestingcoconutsmigrate:

tillthenexttimedoctor:

Steven Moffat, Grief, and How “…Why It’s Killing Doctor Who” Is Mistaken

(Dedicated to  ladymaryandmatthew - have a lovely Christmas, dear!)
I have been asked to address “What Steven Moffat Doesn’t Understand About Grief, and Why It’s Killing Doctor Who”, a wordpress post which you might have seen because links to it have been posted a sheer endless number of times on tumblr. It’s fairly short, so if you’d like to understand my points better, you might want to read it - although I will refer to all major arguments made in the article and, where appropriate, quote from it.
In summary, the article laments what it calls Steven Moffat’s “fear of consequences”, for which it finds evidence in his tendency to reset events and his relatively lower “proper” death count when compared to RTD. Based on this, the author ends on this rather dramatic note:

 “When you cannot deal properly with grief or loss or change, you cannot write believable characters or interesting stories. And as long as this show lacks believable, real, characters and engaging stories, it will continue to suffer. So please, for the good of Doctor Who, shed a little blood and actually deal with it. Revel in consequences. Let your human characters behave like humans. In short: restore the heart to a dying show.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, I strongly disagree with these remarks. Overall, I find the argumentation sloppy, with the inclusion of storylines Moffat was not in charge of and a somewhat incorrect presentation of RTD era Doctor Who. Throughout it all, I can’t help but wonder whether the person who understands grief less might not be Steven Moffat, but the writer of the article. She also decides to ignore much of the complexity and growth which distinguish Moffat’s characters, but seeing as she only touched upon this subject matter in side remarks, I do not have the appropriate space here to discuss this to its full extent.
Instead, I will question the equating of bloodshed with consequence or character growth and discuss some of the instances mentioned in the article. I will come to the conclusion that Moffat’s era does not lack grief and that we do in fact see characters grieving or being deeply affected by the death of a loved one. For Moffat’s Doctor Who, even the “reset button” never truly represents an obliteration of the events that happened. Instead, they retain their meaning through character’s memories and the impact it has on them.

Read More


Please read the response article!  It makes magnificent points.  In addition to the fact that the original writer kinda racistly calls my officer of the law from Blink a “security guard” (worse, “Sally’s security guard,” he’s now an object), and that she literally names it a kid’s show and then bemoans the lack of gore, I would guess her to be about fifteen and never experienced a grief in her life.As I say all the time, I am a nurse.  I am a geriatric nurse, which means I specialize in the health concerns of older populations.  Part of my job is to assess grief and I have seen every type.  Loss of a loved one, which no one feels the same way (I’ve had people think it was their fault, that it was the patient’s fault, the doctor’s fault, my fault.  I’ve had people grieving nothing but the loss of that person’s pension cheque).  My patients grieve loss of mobility, of independence, of their homes, their job or caretaker role, of being able to eat booster juice smoothies.  Some grieve leaving hospital when they are well and being discharged.To measure grief in lives lost - in young lives lost - is an immeasurable insult to the people I work with every day.To insinuate that Amy didn’t mourn her baby, that Rory didn’t suffer when Amy lived her life without him there with her, or that the Doctor and River didn’t have their loved ones ripped from them because it wasn’t “real” is an insult to Stephen Moffat, the other writers, the actors, and to me sitting there weeping like a baby for an hour straight while I watched The Girl Who Waited.

imsuggestingcoconutsmigrate:

tillthenexttimedoctor:

Steven Moffat, Grief, and How “…Why It’s Killing Doctor Who” Is Mistaken

(Dedicated to  ladymaryandmatthew - have a lovely Christmas, dear!)

I have been asked to address “What Steven Moffat Doesn’t Understand About Grief, and Why It’s Killing Doctor Who”, a wordpress post which you might have seen because links to it have been posted a sheer endless number of times on tumblr. It’s fairly short, so if you’d like to understand my points better, you might want to read it - although I will refer to all major arguments made in the article and, where appropriate, quote from it.

In summary, the article laments what it calls Steven Moffat’s “fear of consequences”, for which it finds evidence in his tendency to reset events and his relatively lower “proper” death count when compared to RTD. Based on this, the author ends on this rather dramatic note:

“When you cannot deal properly with grief or loss or change, you cannot write believable characters or interesting stories. And as long as this show lacks believable, real, characters and engaging stories, it will continue to suffer. So please, for the good of Doctor Who, shed a little blood and actually deal with it. Revel in consequences. Let your human characters behave like humans. In short: restore the heart to a dying show.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, I strongly disagree with these remarks. Overall, I find the argumentation sloppy, with the inclusion of storylines Moffat was not in charge of and a somewhat incorrect presentation of RTD era Doctor Who. Throughout it all, I can’t help but wonder whether the person who understands grief less might not be Steven Moffat, but the writer of the article. She also decides to ignore much of the complexity and growth which distinguish Moffat’s characters, but seeing as she only touched upon this subject matter in side remarks, I do not have the appropriate space here to discuss this to its full extent.

Instead, I will question the equating of bloodshed with consequence or character growth and discuss some of the instances mentioned in the article. I will come to the conclusion that Moffat’s era does not lack grief and that we do in fact see characters grieving or being deeply affected by the death of a loved one. For Moffat’s Doctor Who, even the “reset button” never truly represents an obliteration of the events that happened. Instead, they retain their meaning through character’s memories and the impact it has on them.

Read More

Please read the response article! It makes magnificent points. In addition to the fact that the original writer kinda racistly calls my officer of the law from Blink a “security guard” (worse, “Sally’s security guard,” he’s now an object), and that she literally names it a kid’s show and then bemoans the lack of gore, I would guess her to be about fifteen and never experienced a grief in her life.

As I say all the time, I am a nurse. I am a geriatric nurse, which means I specialize in the health concerns of older populations. Part of my job is to assess grief and I have seen every type. Loss of a loved one, which no one feels the same way (I’ve had people think it was their fault, that it was the patient’s fault, the doctor’s fault, my fault. I’ve had people grieving nothing but the loss of that person’s pension cheque). My patients grieve loss of mobility, of independence, of their homes, their job or caretaker role, of being able to eat booster juice smoothies. Some grieve leaving hospital when they are well and being discharged.

To measure grief in lives lost - in young lives lost - is an immeasurable insult to the people I work with every day.

To insinuate that Amy didn’t mourn her baby, that Rory didn’t suffer when Amy lived her life without him there with her, or that the Doctor and River didn’t have their loved ones ripped from them because it wasn’t “real” is an insult to Stephen Moffat, the other writers, the actors, and to me sitting there weeping like a baby for an hour straight while I watched The Girl Who Waited.

posted 2 weeks ago with 393 notes

bennyslegs:

i made a post the other day about reading the most LOVELY potterlock/johnlock fanfic, and i said i would only rec it once i finished to make sure it was good all the way into the end - AND IT WAS - so here it is!

a study in transfiguration

“Ravenclaw common room. Come at once, if convenient. - S.H.”
John shook his head and blinked down at the note again. It was well after hours, did Sherlock honestly think that he would hop out of bed and come practice turning mice into elephants in the dead of night?

John Watson is a Seveth-year Gryffindor student. He and that strange Ravenclaw boy, Sherlock Holmes are partnered together to practice Transfiguration (Hogwarts AU)

I’M IN LOVE WITH THIS FIC - it has so many things i love, including, teens falling in love, SAID TEENS BECOMING ANIMAGI, john liking sherlock’s scent (he falls asleep with sherlock’s cloak thanks) and realistic sex scenes that make my toes curl.

i’m hoping for a sequel - but it doesn’t NEED it, it was lovely on it’s own. please take a read if it sounds like something you’d like!

posted 2 weeks ago with 158 notes
The Frost Is All Over by Chryse

beautifulfic:

treasures-of-221b:

Author’s Name: Chryse

Title: The Frost is All Over

Summary: John was brave and clever and loyal, a commoner who longed for an exciting life.
Sherlock was dashing and brilliant and passionate, an Earl’s son who longed to solve crimes.
Being a Tale of Glorious Adventures, Love Letters, Treachery, Longing, Secret Identities, Deathbed Confessions, First Kisses, Daring Escapes, and True Love.

Genre: Action/Adventure, Romance

Length: 148, 000 words

Warnings: Implied/Referenced Child Abuse, Implied/Referenced Rape/Non-Con, Major Illness, Minor Character Death

Recommendation: Oh my God. Just…wow. This author really knows how to pull you in and keep you there until it’s 3:00AM and you have to work tomorrow, but you really don’t give a damn. I was less than three percent done with this fic before I knew it was going to blow me away. And it delivered! The minor characters are so well fleshed out; you feel like you come to know them even though some aren’t a part of Holmesian canon. The main characters are heart-achingly perfect. The Hall is honestly a place I wish I could visit. I long for the days Sherlock and John spent shooting plums and taking swims in the pond almost as much as they do. I couldn’t put this fic down. And I couldn’t wait to finish so I could read it all over again. Bless you, Chryse.

Link: The Frost is All Over

(Submit your own rec to treasures-of-221b here)

This is going on my “to read” list, right now. Chryse rarely disappoints. Their fic “Breathe” is also very well done!

posted 2 weeks ago with 156 notes

willietheplaidjacket:

Relative Incandescence

The Frost is All Over

If you close your eyes

In Plain Sight

Half a Heart

The Moment Pleasantly Frightful

The King is Dead

Song of the Dauntless Knight

Here are a few fics for you to enjoy, snuggles :)  Let me know if you need any more!

———————————

image

Holy crap dude, you rock. I’m already reading The Frost Is All Over but other than that I don’t think I’ve read any of the others. *throws kisses and confetti at you*

posted 2 weeks ago with 20 notes

prettylittlerobbers:

missolivialouise:

Here’s a thing I’ve had around in my head for a while!

Okay, so I’m pretty sure that by now everyone at least is aware of Steampunk, with it’s completely awesome Victorian sci-fi aesthetic. But what I want to see is Solarpunk – a plausible near-future sci-fi genre, which I like to imagine as based on updated Art Nouveau, Victorian, and Edwardian aesthetics, combined with a green and renewable energy movement to create a world in which children grow up being taught about building electronic tech as well as food gardening and other skills, and people have come back around to appreciating artisans and craftspeople, from stonemasons and smithies, to dress makers and jewelers, and everyone in between. A balance of sustainable energy-powered tech, environmental cities, and wicked cool aesthetics. 

A lot of people seem to share a vision of futuristic tech and architecture that looks a lot like an ipod – smooth and geometrical and white. Which imo is a little boring and sterile, which is why I picked out an Art Nouveau aesthetic for this.

With energy costs at a low, I like to imagine people being more inclined to focus their expendable income on the arts!

Aesthetically my vision of solarpunk is very similar to steampunk, but with electronic technology, and an Art Nouveau veneer.

So here are some buzz words~

Natural colors!
Art Nouveau!
Handcrafted wares!
Tailors and dressmakers!
Streetcars!
Airships!
Stained glass window solar panels!!!
Education in tech and food growing!
Less corporate capitalism, and more small businesses!
Solar rooftops and roadways!
Communal greenhouses on top of apartments!
Electric cars with old-fashioned looks!
No-cars-allowed walkways lined with independent shops!
Renewable energy-powered Art Nouveau-styled tech life!

Can you imagine how pretty it would be to have stained glass windows everywhere that are actually solar panels? The tech is already headed in that direction!  Or how about wide-brim hats, or parasols that are topped with discreet solar panel tech incorporated into the design, with ports you can stick your phone charger in to?

(((Character art by me; click the cityscape pieces to see artist names)))

i am so into this wow

posted 2 weeks ago with 38,215 notes

bootsnblossoms:

image

asdirectedbybecky and consultingpiskies tagged me in a “10 books that have stuck with you”. (Sorry about the late response, Piskies darling! You can see her lovely responses here.)

  1. The Nancy Drew Books
  2. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery 
  3. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Kubla Khan, The Eolian Harp, Dejection: and Ode, Fears in Solitude, etc. by Samuel Tyler Coleridge 
  4. Rogue Mage Series by Faith Hunter
  5. Howl and Other Poems by Alan Ginsberg
  6. Pippi Lonstocking Series by Astrid Lindgren
  7. The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradely
  8. Job: A Comedy of Justic by Robert Heinlein 
  9. Sifting Through the Madness for the Word, the Line, the Way by Charles Bukowski
  10. All the Michael Crichton Books

I feel like this list explains a lot about me, lol. I still own most of these, even though, with the exception of the Rogue Mage series, I feel in love with all of them either as a child or as a teenager.

Anyone else, of course, is welcome to play along! For now, I’ll tag the last ten people who liked something I posted: kathyk-au, bagera69, terpinleather, asenseofobligation, carizee, acafanmom, lisbethblomkvist, badwolfbadwolff, cloama, and mistflyer1102 :)

posted 3 weeks ago with 13 notes

neil-gaiman:

queerfabulousmermaid:

coapostropheneill:

queerfabulousmermaid:

doormouseetcappendix:

Nnedi Okorafor

why didn’t i know about her?!!

she is everything.
get into lagoon and she who fears death immediately.

i trust your judgement. new additions to my summer reading list ayyy

If you read the UNNATURAL CREATURES anthology I did as a benefit book for 826 DC (I coedited it with Maria Dahvana Headley), you’ll already have read an amazing story by Nnnedi already, “Ozioma The Wicked”. She’s a remarkable writer, and a lovely person. I cannot recommend her books highly enough.

posted 3 weeks ago with 11,541 notes
Recs for Your Best Smut Fics

johnwantsit:

SO MANY GOOD RECS.  I figured I would get off my butt and collect them, since we got such a good list.  Where I am familiar with the story, I’ve included annotations, including if there’s any top!John that I remember.

lizzieborednow replied to your post: Your best smut recs?

man and beast, you give me fever, dehumanize me, the red box, strategy games, husband by jingle bell, brace, evidence of human life, John’s Alpha, resonance, sweet surrender, mummy no thank you, choice by heeroluva

Man and Beast, by jupiter-ash (Sherlock and John are in captivity; Werewolf!Sherlock, voyeurism, human experimentation and mild torture, violence, hints of bestiality if werewolves count)

You Give Me Fever, by michi_thekiller (greaserlock!, teenlock)

(See also Closer and undo, unravel, unwind if you like Sherlock and John in a D/s relationship )

Dehumanise Me, by deuxexmycroft (includes non-con and lots of dub-con)

The Red Box, by cleo2010 (there’s a bit partway through chapter 3 with top!John; skim past the scene with the black latex shorts if you don’t want that)

Strategy Games (alas, I am not familiar with this one and cannot find the author or link)

Husband, by jinglebell (cute mushy sex)

Brace, by sulla (I’m assuming this one? good old-fashioned head-banging PWP)

Evidence of Human Life, by thesardine (insane!Sherlock, rough sex, graphic violence to animals)

John’s Alpha, by janto321 (faceofmer) (really neat omegaverse with a, well, non-traditional relationship and navigation of biology)

Resonance (I know of a few fics with this title; I’m not sure which…?)

Sweet Surrender, by supernatural4ever (I’m assuming this one. Classic omegaverse heat-sex. I once counted through the number of orgasms, and it gets murky in a couple of places but I THINK John has 14.  In case you were curious.)

Mummy No Thank You, by unloyal_olio (omegaverse; I think I started this back in the day when it was still a WIP but never finished it, so enter at your own risk)

Choice, by heeroluva (sweet and deeply filthy, kinky loving sex; fisting, remarkably tasteful watersports)

justthefangirl replied to your post: Your best smut recs?

There’s also ‘With Wolflike Sharpness’ by philalethia (wolf!Lock and sub!John oh yis), and ‘Perihelion’ by darkangel1211 (Bondage, aftercare, and so much John getting his pain-kink satisfied by his wonderful dom, Sherlock!)

With a Wolflife Sharpness, by phalethia (just read this and HOLY HANNAH)

Perihelion, by darkangel1211 (a perennial favorite!  BDSM, WIP. Updates slowly and sporadically, but the plot is gentle and mostly about the growth of Sherlock and John’s newly sexual kink relationship.  I just put it on Subscribe and occasionally get the pleasant surprise of an update in my inbox)

justthefangirl answered your post: Your best smut recs?

John Watson’s Way by PlainJane. It’s really good and lovely (WARNING! Switch! Sometimes there’s TopJohn) but so sweet over-all.

timelesslysilly answered your post: Your best smut recs?

Feast by Mazarin221b archiveofourown.org/wor…

rabbykin answered your post: Your best smut recs?

archiveofourown.org/ser… Sub!John and kink and yes.

This series is NewSub!John Headspace by mugenmine.  I know that the fifth story is dom!John, or at least switch, but the rest of it has been and continues to be about sub!John (although Sherlock is a sometimes not very good dom; him pulling his head out of his ass on this topic is part of the developing arc).  I LOVE that series.

Incidentally, Mugen blogs their writing progress on their Tumblr, and it makes for interesting reading if you’re interested in seeing more about how writers write.

posted 3 weeks ago with 71 notes